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The effect of enteral glutamine supplementation on T lymphocyte increase in a rat (Rattus norvegicus) model with thermal contact burns

  • Marelno Zakanito ,
  • David Sontani Perdanakusuma ,
  • Iswinarno Doso Saputro ,

Abstract

Background: The common causes of death from burns are sepsis, infection, and multiorgan failure. Optimal immune cell function is crucial to prevent this condition. In this regard, T lymphocytes play a key role in the immune response to burns. Glutamine, an immunonutrition, serves as a main energy source for immune cells such as lymphocytes, macrophages, and fibroblasts. This study was conducted to understand the difference in T lymphocyte concentration in the tissue of contact thermal burns in control mice compared to mice given enteral glutamine.

Methods: This study was an experimental study using a post-test randomized control design. Male mice were divided into 5 groups, each consisting of 5 mice. Contact thermal burns were created by placing a heated steel rod on the dorsal area of their heads for 4 seconds. Group I did not receive glutamine and was observed 1 hour after the burn. Groups II and III also did not receive glutamine but were observed on day 5 and day 10. Groups IV and V were given glutamine and observed on the same days. Subsequently, the T lymphocyte count was determined through microscopic examination.

Results: Based on the analysis, there was no significant difference in the weight of the mice in all groups (p=0.130). In the control group, the T lymphocyte counts significantly varied between day 1, day 5, and day 10 (p=0.000), with no significant difference between day 5 and day 10 (p=0.410). Similar results were found in the glutamine group (p=0.000) but with no significant difference between day 5 and day 10 (p=0.158). The mean T lymphocyte count was significantly higher in the glutamine group on day 5 (p=0.007) and day 10 (p=0.006) compared to the control group.

Conclusion: Enteral glutamine administration increases the number of T lymphocytes in damaged tissue due to thermal contact burns in mice.

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How to Cite

Zakanito, M., Perdanakusuma, D. S. ., & Saputro, I. D. (2024). The effect of enteral glutamine supplementation on T lymphocyte increase in a rat (Rattus norvegicus) model with thermal contact burns. Bali Medical Journal, 13(3), 1009–1013. https://doi.org/10.15562/bmj.v13i3.5180

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Marelno Zakanito
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David Sontani Perdanakusuma
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Iswinarno Doso Saputro
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